Key player media?

Since I am particularly interested in the media’s role in the later stages of the standardisation process of English, I would like to invite you to participate in a brief survey which also serves as a starting point for a bigger investigation of this subject matter.

The aim of this survey is to identify current attitudes towards the language use of the media. While the majority of questions deals with traditional print media in Great Britain, especially national daily newspapers, a few general questions involve also broadcast media (TV and radio) and digital media (Twitter, blogs, etc.).  The survey, which will take roughly 10 minutes, is available here and your participation is, of course, anonymous and highly appreciated.

 

 

Advertisements

He said, she said or he admitted, she boasted?

Bridging the Unbridgeable

What is wrong with the word said? Personally, I do have nothing against this very useful verb. But as it turns out, some teachers in the US are actively encouraging their students to not make use of it.

sc-9780545083034_lGabriel Roth describes this trend in his Lexicon Valley blog post “Teachers! Please Do Not Make Your Students Use Synonyms for Said,” I Blurted and states examples of teachers including said on lists of banned words or providing pupils with lists of alternatives to use instead. One of the leading proponents of this trend is Leilen Shelton, middle school teacher and author of the book Banishing Boring Words which displays a school boy thinking of words to use instead of said on its cover.  According to Roth, the problem lies in the application of this banning-said approach. While finding useful synonyms and enriching the pupils’ vocabulary are sensible objectives, Roth cautions against…

View original post 217 more words